News

June 2022
The traceRadon consortium presents results at “Radiation Protection for Everyone 6th European Congress on Radiation Protection” in Budapest in June 2022.


With one oral presentation and two poster presentations the consortium was able to support the radiation protection community with new results in research and new customer services: The oral presentation summarized the possibility for “Exploitation of results: Radon metrology for the use in climate change observation and radiation protection” while the posters gave details on calibration processes and new data achieved in field measurements.

As the coordinator, Annette Röttger was happy to meet several colleagues from the consortium face to face for the first time since two years. Aside from a lot of scientific discussions and future planning’s, she received special thanks from Dr. Gémesi Zoltán for her support of the Hungarian research activities. Hungary has joined ICOS in 2021: https://www.icos-cp.eu/event/1069




May 2022
Outdoor radon measurement in the Arctic: the challenges, technology and research benefits


Scott Chambers, Alastair Williams, Alan Griffiths, Ot Sisoutham and Graham Kettlewell of project partner ANSTO recently provided an oral presentation. Outdoor radon measurement in the Arctic: the challenges, technology and research benefits was presented at the 2022 International Arctic Radon Network Program Scientific Workshop, hybrid physical and online meeting, 17-19th May 2022, Yukon University, Canada. The talk was a direct result of a discussion between Annette Röttger of PTB and Violeta Hansen of Aarhus University and in part, discussed work undertaken by Stefan Röttger and Viacheslav Morosh of PTB on the 200L radon detector.



May 2022
Portable two-filter dual-flow-loop 222Rn detector: stand-alone monitor and calibration transfer device

Colleagues from ANSTO and PTB have come together to produce a new paper. Portable two-filter dual-flow-loop 222Rn detector: stand-alone monitor and calibration transfer device is available from Advances in Geosciences and is also available on our Documents and Publications page. Little overlap exists in the required capabilities of 222Rn (radon) monitors for public health and atmospheric research. The former requires robust, compact, easily transportable instruments to characterise daily to yearly variability >100 Bq m−3, whereas the latter requires static instruments capable of characterising sub-hourly variability between 0.1 and 100 Bq m−3. Consequently, detector development has evolved independently for the two research communities, and while many radon measurements are being made world-wide, the full potential of this measurement network can’t be realised because not all results are comparable. Development of a monitor that satisfies the primary needs of both measurement communities, including a calibration traceable to the International System of Units (SI), would constitute an important step toward (i) increasing the availability of radon measurements to both research communities, and (ii) providing a means to harmonize and compare radon measurements across the existing eclectic global network of radon detectors. To this end, we describe a prototype detector built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the EMPIR 19ENV01 traceRadon Project and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). This two-filter dual-flow-loop radon monitor can be transported in a standard vehicle, fits in a 19′′ instrument rack, has a 30 min temporal resolution, and a detection limit of ∼0.14 Bq m−3. It is capable of continuous, long-term, low-maintenance, low-power, indoor or outdoor monitoring with a high sensitivity and an uncertainty of ∼15 % at 1 Bq m−3. Furthermore, we demonstrate the successful transfer of an SI traceable calibration from this portable monitor to a 1500 L two-filter radon monitor under field conditions.



January 2022
Visit UVSQ-LSCE from PTB colleagues: successful shipment of the ARMON and ANSTO monitors to Saclay for A1.3.3 campaign.



After the field test conducted at PTB in the scope of Task 1.3: Calibration and long-term stability of a transfer standard, ARMON and 200L ANSTO monitors were personally shipped by colleagues Stefan Röttger, Florian Mertes and Diether Ohland (driver) of project partner PTB to UVSQ-LSCE (Laboratoire des sciences du climat et de l’environnement) facilities. The equipment arrived on 19.01.2022 at Saclay’s atmospheric ICOS station, where the long-term stability comparison (A1.3.3) is going to take place. Marta Fuente and Dylan Lopez of project partner UVSQ welcomed the colleagues from PTB to SAC ICOS station and helped to unload the equipment.

Even though Covid is making hard to have in-person meetings, finally some project partners get to meet face to face. We are looking forward to seeing the first results of the tests conducted at Saclay. Further information on WP1 can be found here.




January 2022
The traceRadon team come together for technical training of the installation of Radon Flux Campaign Equipment




Jess Connolly of NPL with the support of all the partners, organised a technical workshop to facilitate training and knowledge transfer between partners as part of the joint Radon Flux Campaign.

Claudia Grossi of ANSTO presented on the Auto Flux installation, Marco Capogni of ENEA presented on their Flux monitor installation. Massimo Faure Ragani and Mauro Magnoni of ARPA (Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione Ambientale / Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment) provided a presentation on the SS-TF monitor installation.

Jess presented on the NPL SoilVue10 installation, Viacheslav Morosh of PTB took the team through the Reuter Stokes / Spectrodosimeter installation. Arturo Vargas and María Rodríguez of UPC provided an overview of the DoRayMon installation and Alessandro Rizzo of ENEA presented on their work in Radionuclide Soil activity sampling. Collectively, the partners discussed work in soil texture analysis.

The knowledge transfer aspect of this meeting falls under WP5 of the project. The technical work of the intense radon flux campaign will be carried out to provide data for WP3 and for the identification of RPA (Radon Priority Areas) in WP4. You can find a guide to the workpackages here.



January 2022
Development of 222Rn Emanation Sources with Integrated Quasi 2π Active Monitoring

Florian Mertes, Stefan Röttger and Annette Röttger of project partner PTB have produced a new paper. Published by the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Development of 222Rn Emanation Sources with Integrated Quasi 2π Active Monitoring can be found here and is also available on our Documents and Publications page.

In this work, a novel approach for the standardization of low-level 222Rn emanation is presented. The technique is based on the integration of a 222Rn source, directly, with an α-particle detector, which allows the residual 222Rn to be continuously monitored. Preparation of the device entails thermal physical vapor deposition of 226RaCl2 directly onto the surface of a commercially available ion implanted Si-diode detector, resulting in a thin-layer geometry. This enables continuous collection of well resolved α-particle spectra of the nuclei, decaying within the deposited layer, with a detection efficiency of approximately 0.5 in a quasi 2π geometry. The continuously sampled α-particle spectra are used to derive the emanation by statistical inversion. It is possible to achieve this with high temporal resolution due to the small background and the high counting efficiency of the presented technique. The emanation derived in this way exhibits a dependence on the relative humidity of up to 15% in the range from 20% rH to 90% rH. Traceability to the SI is provided by employing defined solid-angle α-particle spectrometry to characterize the counting efficiency of the modified detectors. The presented technique is demonstrated to apply to a range covering the release of at least 1 to 210 222Rn atoms per second, and it results in SI-traceable emanation values with a combined standard uncertainty not exceeding 2%. This provides a pathway for the realization of reference atmospheres covering typical environmental 222Rn levels and thus drastically improves the realization and the dissemination of the derived unit of the activity concentration concerning 222Rn in air.



January 2022
Ion implantation of 226Ra for a primary 222Rn emanation standard

Project colleagues from PTB have produced a joint publication with colleagues from the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Physik and the Leibniz Universität Hannover.

Published by Applied Radiation and Isotopes, Ion implantation of 226Ra for a primary 222Rn emanation standard can be found here and is also available on our Documents and Publications page.

Laser resonance ionization at the RISIKO 30 kV mass separator has been used to produce isotopically and isobarically pure and well quantified 222Rn emanation standards. Based upon laser-spectroscopic preparation studies, ion implantation into aluminum and tungsten targets has been carried out, providing overall implantation efficiencies of 40% up to 60%. The absolute implanted activity of 226Ra was determined by the technique of defined solid-angle α-particle spectrometry, where excellent energy resolution was observed. The 222Rn emanation coefficient of the produced targets was studied using α-particle and γ-ray spectrometry, and yielded results between 0.23 and 0.34, with relative uncertainty on the order of 1%. No dependence exceeding a 1% change of the emanation on humidity could be identified in the range of 15 %rH to 75 %rH, whereas there were hints of a slight correlation between the emanation and temperature. Additionally, and as expected, the emanation coefficient was found to be dependent on the target material as well as the implanted dose.



January 2022
Outdoor Radon as a Tool to Estimate Radon Priority Areas—A Literature Overview

Some of the project partners have come together on a new paper. Published by the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Outdoor Radon as a Tool to Estimate Radon Priority Areas—A Literature Overview can be found here and is also available on our Documents and Publications page.

Doses from the exposure to outdoor radon are typically an order of magnitude smaller than those from indoor radon, causing a greater interest on investigation of the latter for radiation protection issues. As a consequence, assessment of radon priority areas (RPA) is mainly based on indoor radon measurements. Outdoor radon measurements might be needed to guarantee a complete estimation of radiological risk and may help to improve the estimation of RPA. Therefore, authors have analysed the available literature on outdoor radon to give an overview of outdoor radon surveys and potential correlation with indoor radon and estimation of RPA.

The review has shown that outdoor radon surveys were performed at much smaller scale compared to indoor radon. Only a few outdoor radon maps were produced, with a much smaller density, covering a larger area, and therefore putting doubt on the representativeness of this data. Due to a large variety of techniques used for outdoor radon measurements and requirement to have detectors with a high sensitivity and resistance to harsh environmental conditions, a standardised measurement protocol should be derived. This is no simple endeavour since there are more applications in different scientific disciplines for outdoor radon measurements compared to indoor radon.

December 2021
Checking monitors with PTB




November and December 2021: Stefan and Annette check the installation at PTB. The two new radon monitors (ANSTO 200 L and ARMON) are installed in a cabin at the reference site for a field test in the scope of Task 1.3: Calibration and long-term stability of a transfer standard. Air is drawn in from the centre of the reference field via a stainless-steel tube and split between the two radon monitors via a flow divider. This ensures that both monitors can operate with identical sampling.

At the same time, the first test of the radon flux system has started according to that of Task 2.3. This is the first time that radon flux measurements are performed at the PTBs’ reference site. The question of whether one can successfully prove the expected correlation already in the first experiments makes every readout of the data exciting. Even if nobody can travel to PTB due to COVID restrictions, the data are read out online with great enthusiasm: Whether at UPC, Spain or ANSTO, Australia!

You can discover more about the work of Task 2.3 and WP2 here.



November 2021
Successful M18 meeting for traceRadon

A successful M18 meeting for the traceRadon project was held online by project partner UVSQ. Annette Röttger (PTB) coordinator of the project and Marta Fuente-Lastra (UVSQ) welcomed all to the meeting held online due to the pandemic.



Ingeborg Levin and Scott Chambers of project collaborator ANSTO provided the invited talk, Atmospheric 222Radon observations – history and prospects.

This was followed by presentations on work progressed under WP4 (Radon and radon flux in maps for radiation protection issues) were provided by Giorgia Cinelli (JRC), Igor Čeliković (VINS) and Miguel Ángel Hernández-Ceballos (UCO).

Presentations on work progressed under WP1 (Traceable measurements of outdoor radon activity concentrations) by Stefan Röttger, Monika Mazánová (CMI), Petr Otáhal (SUJCHBO), Florian Mertes and Stefan Röttger (PTB), Roger Curcoll, Claudia Grossi and Arturo Vargas (UPC), Ileana Rădulescu and Mihail-Razvan Ioan (IFIN-HH) and Dafina Kikaj and Chris Rennick (NPL).

Presentations on work progressed under WP2 (Radon flux measurements) were provided by Claudia Grossi (UPC), Daniel Rabago and Luis Quindos (UC), Francesco Cardellini and Alessandro Rizzo (ENEA) and Jess Connolly (NPL).
For WP3 (Validation of radon flux models and inventories using radon flux and terrestrial data) progress was presented to the consortium by Ute Karstens (LUND), Arturo Vargas (UPC), Viacheslav Morosh (PTB) and Susana Barbosa (INESC).
Presentations on work progressed under WP5 (Creating Impact) was presented by Garry Hensey (NPL) and Annette Röttger provided updates WP6 (Management and coordination).

During the work package presentations and discussions, there was further discussion with the consortium regarding the output of the project and future progress towards M27. You can find a copy of the meeting agenda here.



November 2021
traceRadon: Newsletter #2




The second issue of the traceRadon project newsletter is now available to download here.

The newsletter features activity from the work packages and recent developments, notably work on outdoor radon activity concentrations (WP1), the radon flux Intercomparison campaign at Esles de Cayón (Cantabria, Spain) (WP2), radon flux models and inventories (WP3) and radon and radon-flux in maps (WP4).


November 2021
Reuter-Stokes Characterization at ENEA

Alessandro Rizzo of project partner ENEA (Agenzia Nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l’energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile) has provided us with an update on work under WP3.

The Reuter-Stokes High Pressure Ionization Chamber (HPIC) within the Radioprotection Institute of project partner ENEA has been used in the ENEA Metrologic Institute Irradiation Facility for characterization in terms of Relative Response –



The Relative Response in function of energy given by the manufacturer is validated punctually using Cs-137 and Co-60 sources.

The reference dose-rate has been chosen to be comparable with the environmental one measured in ENEA site, about 100 nSv/h.

The work of this activity forms part of Task 3.2 and the inclusion of data from radiological early warning systems under WP3.

The aim of this task is to evaluate the dosimetric and spectrometric data from radiological early warning networks in Europe (collected by partner JRC) to further improve current radon flux models and inventories and validate process-based radon flux maps.

You can find more information on WP3 here.

ENEA is a public body aimed at research and technological innovation. Through its Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiation Metrology, ENEA develops and provides national standards in different sectors (dosimetry, radionuclides and neutrons) of the ionising radiations. ENEA is a signatory of the CIPM MRA, member of the CIPM-CCRI(I) and CIPM-CCRI(II) and Associated Member of EURAMET.


November 2021
Brainstorming at the University of Siegen



Marek Werner (middle), Kerstin Weinberg (left) and Ralf Nötzel (right) of project collaborators the University of Siegen are seen here discussing the signal processing and mechanical set-up of a 30 L multi-wire ionisation chamber for the measurement of the radon activity concentration: an additional prototype for use in WP1 becomes a real option. The spectrometric data on the alpha decay of radon in air is detected.

Within this development, the expertise of different branches of the University is combined. Kerstin has studied mechanical engineering with a research focus on fracture mechanics and elastomers, Ralf has studied electrical engineering and Marek is a physicist.

The aim of WP1 is to develop traceable methods for the measurement of outdoor low-level radon activity concentrations in the range of 1 Bq m-3 to 100 Bq m-3 with uncertainties of 10 % (k=1) to be used in climate and radiation protection networks. These methods will include two new traceable Rn-222 emanation sources below 100 Bq m-3, a transfer instrument traceably calibrated with these new sources and a calibration procedure suitable to enable a traceable calibration of environmental atmospheric radon measurement systems in the field. You can find more information on WP1 here.



November 2021
UPC introduces the new version of ARMON

Roger Curcoll of project partner Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) takes us through the new version of the ARMON (Atmospheric Radon MONitor)



The ARMON has been mounted and characterized at the UPC radon chamber during the last few months. The monitor, is based on the alpha spectrometry of positive 218Po ions collected on a PIPS detector surface, that has been designed for measuring low ambient 222Rn activity concentration (<100 Bq m-3).

The ARMON has been sent to the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the beginning of this month to be calibrated so that it can participate in a one-month intercomparison campaign with different atmospheric radon monitors. This work forms part of WP1 of the project

For further information on the work of WP1, see our BFKH calibration work with the 840L radon chamber news story below. You can find out more about the project work packages here.

UPC is part of the recognised research group “Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics” in the fields of ionising radiations. UPC activity is mainly focused on research and service in the environmental radioactivity field. This includes dose assessment in the case of radiological incidents radiation dose due to the exposure to environmental radionuclides, and the design and build of instruments for monitoring ionising radiation and particularly for Rn-222 and Rn-222 flux measurements. UPC is a partner in EMPIR projects.



November 2021
BFKH calibration work with the 840L radon chamber

László Szűcs of project partner Budapest Főváros Kormányhivatala (BFKH) illustrates some of the work using the 840L radon chamber for calibration of radon measuring instruments for radon emanation measurements.



Above, on the left you can see the front-view of radon chamber and on the right the back part of the chamber with the radon source and radon buffer. The work forms part of WP1 of the project.

The aim of WP1 is to develop traceable methods for the measurement of outdoor low-level radon activity concentrations in the range of 1 Bq m-3 to 100 Bq m-3 with uncertainties of 10 % (k=1) to be used in climate and radiation protection networks. These methods will include two new traceable Rn-222 emanation sources below 100 Bq m-3, a transfer instrument traceably calibrated with these new sources and a calibration procedure suitable to enable a traceable calibration of environmental atmospheric radon measurement systems in the field.

You can find out more about the project work packages here.

BFKH is the Hungarian NMI and the government’s territorial administrative agency with general powers. The Department “Metrological and Technical Supervisory Department” represents Hungary at international metrology forums and participates in international metrology programmes.

November 2021
Inter-comparison of commercial continuous radon monitors responses.


Project partners from IFIN-HH, PTB and UPC have collaborated on a new paper for the Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment journal (January 2022), Inter-comparison of commercial continuous radon monitors responses.

Indoor and outdoor (atmospheric) radon activity concentrations need to be measured as accurate as possible for radiation protection and for climate applications. Particularly radon concentrations below 100 Bq m−3, useful for the retrieval of radon prone areas and for atmospheric studies, still need a robust metrological chain to ensure their quality. Ones of the most common used commercial continuous radon monitors were compared here under slightly different environmental conditions. The measured data set were divided into two groups (< 100 Bq m−3 and ≥ 100 Bq m−3) to assess the monitors responses and their associated uncertainties. Nevertheless, these results should also to point out if commercial monitors are suitable for monitoring low atmospheric radon concentrations with an associated uncertainty of 10% (k=1). This work, carried out within the EMPIR 19ENV01 traceRadon project, aims to offer a starting point for the development of a future radon monitor as transfer standard to increase the metrological capabilities of atmospheric radon monitoring.

Abstract from Inter-comparison of commercial continuous radon monitors responses

The paper can be found here and also on our Documents & Publications page.

IFIN-HH is one of the most representative physics research institutes of Romania, being involved in a wide range of fields of physics (theoretical, fundamental and applied). It is a signatory of the CIPM MRA, member of the CIPM-CCRI(II) and Associated Member of EURAMET. It has a significant experience in primary and secondary methods of activity standardisation including Rn-222, in determination/evaluation of nuclear decay data and in providing calibration services to national stakeholders.

PTB has long-term experience in the provision of activity standards, the measurement of airborne radioactivity concentrations, the investigation and calibration of various dosimetry systems for environmental radiation monitoring as well as in the operation of related calibration facilities traceable to primary standards. PTB operates a worldwide unique combination of reference facilities for dosimetry at low dose rates, has organised several intercomparison exercises and coordinated EMRP as well as EMPIR projects. PTB will coordinate this project.

UPC is part of the recognised research group “Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics” in the fields of ionising radiations. UPC activity is mainly focused on research and service in the environmental radioactivity field. This includes dose assessment in the case of radiological incidents radiation dose due to the exposure to environmental radionuclides, and the design and build of instruments for monitoring ionising radiation and particularly for Rn-222 and Rn-222 flux measurements. UPC is a partner in EMPIR projects.


November 2021
New metrology for radon at the environmental level

The partners have collaborated to produce an open access paper that provides an introduction and overview of the aims of the traceRadon project.

New metrology for radon at the environmental level is available here, and also in Measurement Science and Technology, Volume 32, Number 12.

October 2021
Field Campaign work by UVSQ

Marta Fuente of UVSQ project partner prepares for the measurements campaigns in Task 2.3 under WP2. The aim of this task is to perform intense radon flux measurement campaigns in the field at AMNS (Atmospheric Monitoring Network stations) or RMS (Radiological Monitoring Station) using the calibrated continuous radon flux monitors from Tasks 2.1 and 2.2.

One of the four selected locations for the field campaigns is Saclay. The site proposed, next to the Saclay tower of the ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System) network, is examined for suitability to install all the equipment required: radon flux monitors, soil moisture sensors, dose rate monitors and spectrodosimeters.

You can find out more about WP2 here

UVSQ hosts the Atmospheric Thematic Centre of ICOS ERIC. In ICOS, atmospheric measurements are coordinated via the Atmospheric Thematic Centre in France which is composed of a data centre and a metrology laboratory. In this project UVSQ will focus on the ICOS atmospheric installations.



October 2021
SUJCHBO Field Calibrations

Petr Otáhal of project partner SUJCHBO (Státní ústav jaderné, chemické a biologické ochrany, v.v.i.) has provided us with an update on work under WP1.

The photo below shows testing during field calibrations of a radon activity concentration monitor with the help of CMI and using a low-level Rn-222 source.

SUJCHBO operates the Authorised Metrological Centre and accredited Calibration Laboratory for the calibration of measuring devices of airborne radon activity concentration and radon equilibrium activity concentration. SUJCHBO laboratories provide among other technical services for the State Office of Nuclear Safety. SUJCHBO participates in the Coalition of International Radon Associations (COIRA) intercomparison and is a partner in EMPIR 16ENV10 MetroRADON.

CMI undertakes research in ionising radiation related to the production of activity standards (Rn-222 and other radionuclides), absolute activity measurement, spectrometry and dose measurements. In the field of ionising radiation metrology, CMI uses absolute activity measurement techniques, alpha-, beta-, X- and gamma-ray spectrometers, Cs-137, Co-60 and X-ray irradiators, neutron sources, radiochemical laboratory equipment and a testing laboratory.



May 2021
Approximate sequential Bayesian filtering to estimate Rn-222 emanation from Ra-226 sources from spectra

Florian Mertes, Stefan Röttger and Annette Röttger of project partner PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) have produced a short paper as part of the Sensor and Measurement Science International Conference 2021 conference proceedings.

Approximate sequential Bayesian filtering to estimate Rn-222 emanation from Ra-226 sources from spectra can be found here at the conference website, and also on our Documents & Publications page.



March 2021
traceRadon welcomes the University of Siegen!

The University of Siegen (Universität Siegen) has signed a letter of agreement with traceRadon. The goal of the collaboration is to build a large-volume radon detector for WP1 that measures the activity concentration of radon in air directly (i.e., not via its progeny). This is possible according to the technical principle of the multiwire ionisation chamber, but is it technically feasible? With the expertise of University Siegen in mechanical engineering, perhaps.

You can find more information on WP1 here.

The University of Siegen is a public research university and is part of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, a society of Germany’s leading research universities.


February 2021
traceRadon: Newsletter #1



The first issue of the traceRadon project newsletter is now available and can be downloaded here

February 2021
Successful M9 meeting for traceRadon

A successful M9 meeting for the traceRadon project was held online by project partner CLOR in February. Annette Röttger (PTB) coordinator of the project and Paweł Krajewski (CLOR) welcomed all to the meeting held online due to the pandemic. This was followed by presentations on work progressed under WP1 (Traceable measurements of outdoor radon activity concentrations) by Annette Röttger, Monika Mazanova (CMI), Stefan Röttger (PTB), Arturo Vargas (UPC) and Scott Chambers (ANSTO).

Presentations on work progressed under WP2 (Radon flux measurements) were provided by C. Grossi (UPC) and D. Rabago (UC).

For WP3 (Validation of radon flux models and inventories using radon flux and terrestrial data) progress was presented to the consortium by Ute Karstens (LUND), Arturo Vargas (UPC), Viacheslav Morosh (PTB) and Susana Barbosa (INESC).

Presentations on work progressed under WP4 (Radon and radon flux in maps for radiation protection issues) were provided by Gordana Pantelic (VINS), Valeria Gruber (AGES), Susana Barbosa and Giorgia Cinelli (JRC). Garry Hensey (NPL) and Annette Röttger provided updates on WP5 (Creating Impact).

During the work package presentations and discussions, there was further discussion with the consortium regarding the output of the project and future progress towards M18.

January 2021
traaceRadon input to the European Metrology Network for Climate and Ocean Observation

Annette Röttger of project partner PTB provided the European Metrology Network for Climate and Ocean Observation with a brief introduction and summary of the project goals for the Stakeholder Needs Report December 2020 (p.26).

The aim of the the European Metrology Network is to build partnerships between measurement specialists and the climate & ocean observation communities to enhance metrological best practice across Europe and beyond.

The 2015 Paris Agreement seeks to limit the rise in temperature of the Earth to less than 2 °C, with a target of less than 1.5 °C, above pre-industrial levels to reduce the risks and impacts of climate change. To achieve this, many countries have policies to achieve ‘net zero’ emissions by the middle of the century. This extremely challenging goal requires immediate, sustained and significant annual decreases in greenhouse gas emissions and a simultaneous increase in carbon sinks (in soils, forests and ocean phytoplankton).

The ocean is an example of the challenging balance between human and environmental needs. Many people depend on the oceans for food security, tourism, transportation, heritage and climate regulation. Many are also vulnerable to sea level rise and from the increased storms generated by a warming ocean and atmosphere. We have over-exploited the seas, with fish stocks reducing, mineral resources over-extracted, plastics found even at the deepest parts of the ocean, and with coral reefs and other unique habitats dying from increasing temperatures and acidity.

Governments, international organisations, businesses and charities, need to make complex, inter-related decisions to meet ambitious targets for environmental sustainability and social and economic development. Such decisions rely on the availability of reliable environmental data information services that have been quality assured.

October 2020
The first scientific workshop was held at the PTB

July 2020
Successful Kick Off meeting for traceRadon

A successful Kick Off meeting for the traceRadon project was held online by project coordinator PTB in July.